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Life In Berlin: Punk And The Ramones In Berlin

The Ramones Museum holds a special place in Berlin’s musical history. “I was such a big fan before I got into the band” We are speaking with CJ Ramone. “That initial time period of being there was unbelievably awkward, bizarre – to be around the guys on a daily basis and find out intimate details of their lives and it was really strange but it absolutely changed me over the years, completely changed who I was as a person from all my experiences traveling and getting to see all the other...
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Life In Berlin: Punk And The Ramones In Berlin

1 hour ago
Amy Sussman/Getty Images

    

The Ramones Museum holds a special place in Berlin’s musical history.

“I was such a big fan before I got into the band”

We are speaking with CJ Ramone.

Life In Berlin: Cameron Silver

2 hours ago
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images

    

    

As a city, Berlin’s culture is unique from music to art to language to literature.  The aesthetic of its fashion is one of the most vibrant. Cameron Silver, owner of Decades in LA, celebrated guest on many a red carpet, found a few moments to speak about what makes Berlin’s style radiate.

"A city like Berlin has a very distinctive and celebrated street style and I think less of an impact on its formal red carpet moments. Because this is not really a red carpet town. I guess the red carpet is a little bit more free and unexpected."

Governments "must stop pretending the protection of civilians is beyond their power," Amnesty International says in its human rights report for 2014. The group faults the U.S. on a range of issues, from the use of excessive force by police to rights abuses in the name of fighting terrorism.

"Governments pay lip service to the importance of protecting civilians," Amnesty says. "And yet the world's politicians have miserably failed to protect those in greatest need."

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said this morning on French radio that if separatist troops advanced on the Ukrainian city of Mariupol, that would constitute a new red line.

"I told my counterpart Sergei Lavrov that such a move would mean Russia wants to make a link with Crimea, and that would change everything," said Fabius.

Then he stated that Europe would have to look at slapping new sanctions on Russia.

Life In Berlin: Nastassja Kinski

Feb 24, 2015

 

    

German actress Nastassja Kinski was only 14 when she made her film debut in "Wrong Move". It was the start of a successful collaboration with Wim Wenders, who was awarded an honorary Golden Bear at the recent Berlinale. And although, Kinski has worked with other heavyweight directors, like Polanski and Coppola, she seems to have a special bond with Wim Wenders .

 

"When I was small what I liked about him, he was very quiet and he listened a lot. And if he spoke, you could tell it's the only thing he wants to say."

 

European finance ministers have approved Greece's proposed economic reforms and agreed to extend financial assistance to the country by four months.

In a statement, the Eurogroup said it would begin "national procedures" – including parliamentary votes in some member states – to give the deal a final approval.

In a claim that's meeting with skepticism in Kiev, Russian-backed separatists say they've started to withdraw heavy weapons in eastern Ukraine, as required by a recent cease-fire. Ukraine's military says separatist attacks are ongoing.

The development comes after Russia's President Vladimir Putin said he thinks a war with Ukraine would be "apocalyptic" — but that the area is now on a path to stability, after the recent Minsk agreement.

NPR Specials: Climate One - Water World

Feb 23, 2015
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This week on NPR Specials, Climate disruption is changing weather around the world. Parts of America are seeing fierce droughts and then punishing storms and flooding. Scientists say the wets will get wetter and the dry periods will get drier. Water systems are stressed and farmers, city dwellers and fish are all affected. In response, new farming methods are being tried out. Creative conservation practices and new technologies are helping stretch each gallon. But the question remains: How much water will we have in the future? What will it cost?

Noting deadly attacks by Russian-backed separatists who have renewed a push near the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine says it can't withdraw heavy weapons from the front lines, as required by a week-old cease-fire.

"Ukraine's military says two government soldiers were killed and about 10 wounded in the past 24 hours," NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow. "A government spokesman say its positions were hit by shelling 27 times in the past day. Meanwhile, of course, the separatists are claiming that the government initiates the attacks."

Some 7000 fans of the Rotterdam soccer team Feyenoord are believed to have traveled to Rome for yesterday's Europa League game against AS Roma.

The game ended in a draw, 1-1, a needed anticlimax after two days of street battles.

On Wednesday, tourists fled and shops hurriedly closed their shutters as Dutch soccer fans took over the central marketplace known as Campo de' Fiori — Field of Flowers — and left it a field of trash.

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NPR Specials

David McNew/Getty Images

NPR Specials: Climate One - Water World

This week on NPR Specials, Climate disruption is changing weather around the world. Parts of America are seeing fierce droughts and then punishing storms and flooding. Scientists say the wets will get wetter and the dry periods will get drier. Water systems are stressed and farmers, city dwellers and fish are all affected. In response, new farming methods are being tried out. Creative conservation practices and new technologies are helping stretch each gallon. But the question remains: How...
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